Currently on The Farm

The Heritage Family Farms Blog


Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

1 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments

After the Flood (well, we hope)

We had more rain over the weekend, but just for a bit. Also had a quick shower midmorning today.  We are hoping the big rains are behind us now though.  This photo is of the drudge ditch to the north of the home farm, but is indicative of the rainfall we received on all of our farms. You can see that the ditch is out of it's banks and flowing fast, so it's doing it's job! This photo was taken Saturday morning and there has been much improvement of the water situation as of today.  

 

Two separate rain events dumped large volumes of water on our crops over the course of last week, which resulted in seed being underwater in several spots.  Even with good water management and fields prepared to handle water, this volume of water left us in a less than desirable position. 

 

Mother nature has been somewhat kind to us, however in the fact that the temps have been cooler after the rains.  The seedlings that are emerging can stand their underwater situation longer in the cool temperatures.  We are hoping that replanting and spotting in seed will be kept somewhat minimal compared to what it could have been if the temperatures had sky rocketed after all of the precipitation.  

A few days and some warmer temperatures at this point in the game, will be needed to evaluate the stands of the seedlings and better evaluate the situation going forward. There is always something to be thankful for, even after the flood!  

1 Comments

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

1 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments

After the Flood (well, we hope)

We had more rain over the weekend, but just for a bit. Also had a quick shower midmorning today.  We are hoping the big rains are behind us now though.  This photo is of the drudge ditch to the north of the home farm, but is indicative of the rainfall we received on all of our farms. You can see that the ditch is out of it's banks and flowing fast, so it's doing it's job! This photo was taken Saturday morning and there has been much improvement of the water situation as of today.  

 

Two separate rain events dumped large volumes of water on our crops over the course of last week, which resulted in seed being underwater in several spots.  Even with good water management and fields prepared to handle water, this volume of water left us in a less than desirable position. 

 

Mother nature has been somewhat kind to us, however in the fact that the temps have been cooler after the rains.  The seedlings that are emerging can stand their underwater situation longer in the cool temperatures.  We are hoping that replanting and spotting in seed will be kept somewhat minimal compared to what it could have been if the temperatures had sky rocketed after all of the precipitation.  

A few days and some warmer temperatures at this point in the game, will be needed to evaluate the stands of the seedlings and better evaluate the situation going forward. There is always something to be thankful for, even after the flood!  

1 Comments

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

1 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments

After the Flood (well, we hope)

We had more rain over the weekend, but just for a bit. Also had a quick shower midmorning today.  We are hoping the big rains are behind us now though.  This photo is of the drudge ditch to the north of the home farm, but is indicative of the rainfall we received on all of our farms. You can see that the ditch is out of it's banks and flowing fast, so it's doing it's job! This photo was taken Saturday morning and there has been much improvement of the water situation as of today.  

 

Two separate rain events dumped large volumes of water on our crops over the course of last week, which resulted in seed being underwater in several spots.  Even with good water management and fields prepared to handle water, this volume of water left us in a less than desirable position. 

 

Mother nature has been somewhat kind to us, however in the fact that the temps have been cooler after the rains.  The seedlings that are emerging can stand their underwater situation longer in the cool temperatures.  We are hoping that replanting and spotting in seed will be kept somewhat minimal compared to what it could have been if the temperatures had sky rocketed after all of the precipitation.  

A few days and some warmer temperatures at this point in the game, will be needed to evaluate the stands of the seedlings and better evaluate the situation going forward. There is always something to be thankful for, even after the flood!  

1 Comments

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

1 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments

After the Flood (well, we hope)

We had more rain over the weekend, but just for a bit. Also had a quick shower midmorning today.  We are hoping the big rains are behind us now though.  This photo is of the drudge ditch to the north of the home farm, but is indicative of the rainfall we received on all of our farms. You can see that the ditch is out of it's banks and flowing fast, so it's doing it's job! This photo was taken Saturday morning and there has been much improvement of the water situation as of today.  

 

Two separate rain events dumped large volumes of water on our crops over the course of last week, which resulted in seed being underwater in several spots.  Even with good water management and fields prepared to handle water, this volume of water left us in a less than desirable position. 

 

Mother nature has been somewhat kind to us, however in the fact that the temps have been cooler after the rains.  The seedlings that are emerging can stand their underwater situation longer in the cool temperatures.  We are hoping that replanting and spotting in seed will be kept somewhat minimal compared to what it could have been if the temperatures had sky rocketed after all of the precipitation.  

A few days and some warmer temperatures at this point in the game, will be needed to evaluate the stands of the seedlings and better evaluate the situation going forward. There is always something to be thankful for, even after the flood!  

1 Comments