Currently on The Farm

The Heritage Family Farms Blog


Our graduating (today!) senior in high school was interviewed about the current state of agriculture and the economy. Read the article HERE. It was published by Whartan School whose mission is to "provide high school students and educators around the world with a deeper understanding of business and personal finance and to equip them with the skills to excel in the global marketplace. We are a part of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, a world leader in business education." 

 

Congratulations Makenna, on your graduation from high school as well as all of your accomplishments the last 13 years. Not only what you have done in FFA, but in academics, leadership and even athletics (run Mak run!) 

 

We see your passion for our family farm each and every day, your respect for those that paved the way before you and your desire to better the world of row crop agriculture for our farm and our fellow farmers.  With your determination, leadership skills and that sharp brain of yours, we know that you will do all you set out to do. We are glad you are OURS and we are thankful that God put agriculture on your heart just like your Great-grandpa, Grandpa, Uncle Cory and your Dad.  You will do much to improve the world of agriculture in your future! 

Our graduating (today!) senior in high school was interviewed about the current state of agriculture and the economy. Read the article HERE. It was published by Whartan School whose mission is to "provide high school students and educators around the world with a deeper understanding of business and personal finance and to equip them with the skills to excel in the global marketplace. We are a part of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, a world leader in business education." 

 

Congratulations Makenna, on your graduation from high school as well as all of your accomplishments the last 13 years. Not only what you have done in FFA, but in academics, leadership and even athletics (run Mak run!) 

 

We see your passion for our family farm each and every day, your respect for those that paved the way before you and your desire to better the world of row crop agriculture for our farm and our fellow farmers.  With your determination, leadership skills and that sharp brain of yours, we know that you will do all you set out to do. We are glad you are OURS and we are thankful that God put agriculture on your heart just like your Great-grandpa, Grandpa, Uncle Cory and your Dad.  You will do much to improve the world of agriculture in your future! 

Amish Country Tractor Cruise

Each year now for 10 years, a subcommittee from the FFA Alumni Association puts together an astounding event.  Starting about day break, if you venture into town at Yoder's Country Kitchen, and if you have ever been to Arthur, you have SURELY eaten at Yoder's, unless you came on Sunday, then you probably just wish you had eaten at Yoder's.  Well the tractors and trucks and rumbling, popping engines start rolling in one by one.  Red, green, orange and gray starts to fill the parking lot.  Some get registered early and enjoy coffee and some biscuits and gravy along with fellowship and coffee shop talk before the drive.  Others roll in as the parade begins.

 

It is awe inspiring even for non tractor enthusiasts.  The shear sound of the engines and the rolling of the tires makes this event worth seeing.  This taking nothing away from the nostalgia of years gone by.  When our grandfathers and great grandfathers did all of their farming and chores using such tractors.  Seeing the open cabs and wide set back tires paired with the sometimes close set front ends one can't evade thoughts of leather skinned men toiling hours on end in the hot sun, the spitting rain or the bitter cold to get the crops in the ground.  How many acres do you think they could plant in a full day's work back then?  How tired, dirty and worn must grandpa have been after a day such as that.  Contrasting these vintage tractors with what is sitting out in the barn lot mesmerizes ones thoughts back to a simpler time.

 

A shout out to these forefathers with pride and exclamation is what this cruise represents.  So many have plaques on the sides of the tractors indicating make/model current owner and sometimes the origin or original owner of the tractor.  Tears well as tractors cruise by and stories are told of hunting down a tractor belonging to a great grandfather, lovingly restoring it and proudly entering into such a display of Americana. 

 

 

 

 

Last year we were able to help with the cruise for the first time, and we are so grateful and humbled by the experience.  Our oldest son was able to drive a tractor, be it not an old one, as we don't have an old tractor!!  The day was squelching hot, the pavement sticky from the sun and the drivers sweating profusely, some under umbrellas and some toughing it in out in the hot June sun!  Jace, our boy was feeling very badly in his air conditioned cab!  He said at one point he cracked the windows open as a gesture of guilt for his temperature controlled ride.  That softy!!  

 

 

The cruise snakes through the Amish countryside and lands at a farmstead for lunch served up by a local caterer (yum) and hosted by a local farmer.  We are WAY, WAY, WAY excited that we are going to be the lunch stop this coming June!  We cannot wait!  

 

 

 

The Amish Tractor Cruise has a Facebook page for those interested in making an entry or those interested in finding a spot along the route to just enjoy the display.   You can get more information HERE.  A tip back to those that have come before us, keeping their memory alive, the marvel of American agricultural engineering or just the sounds of those amazing engines, there is something for everyone coming to the countryside of Arthur this summer!

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

0 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments

Amish Country Tractor Cruise

Each year now for 10 years, a subcommittee from the FFA Alumni Association puts together an astounding event.  Starting about day break, if you venture into town at Yoder's Country Kitchen, and if you have ever been to Arthur, you have SURELY eaten at Yoder's, unless you came on Sunday, then you probably just wish you had eaten at Yoder's.  Well the tractors and trucks and rumbling, popping engines start rolling in one by one.  Red, green, orange and gray starts to fill the parking lot.  Some get registered early and enjoy coffee and some biscuits and gravy along with fellowship and coffee shop talk before the drive.  Others roll in as the parade begins.

 

It is awe inspiring even for non tractor enthusiasts.  The shear sound of the engines and the rolling of the tires makes this event worth seeing.  This taking nothing away from the nostalgia of years gone by.  When our grandfathers and great grandfathers did all of their farming and chores using such tractors.  Seeing the open cabs and wide set back tires paired with the sometimes close set front ends one can't evade thoughts of leather skinned men toiling hours on end in the hot sun, the spitting rain or the bitter cold to get the crops in the ground.  How many acres do you think they could plant in a full day's work back then?  How tired, dirty and worn must grandpa have been after a day such as that.  Contrasting these vintage tractors with what is sitting out in the barn lot mesmerizes ones thoughts back to a simpler time.

 

A shout out to these forefathers with pride and exclamation is what this cruise represents.  So many have plaques on the sides of the tractors indicating make/model current owner and sometimes the origin or original owner of the tractor.  Tears well as tractors cruise by and stories are told of hunting down a tractor belonging to a great grandfather, lovingly restoring it and proudly entering into such a display of Americana. 

 

 

 

 

Last year we were able to help with the cruise for the first time, and we are so grateful and humbled by the experience.  Our oldest son was able to drive a tractor, be it not an old one, as we don't have an old tractor!!  The day was squelching hot, the pavement sticky from the sun and the drivers sweating profusely, some under umbrellas and some toughing it in out in the hot June sun!  Jace, our boy was feeling very badly in his air conditioned cab!  He said at one point he cracked the windows open as a gesture of guilt for his temperature controlled ride.  That softy!!  

 

 

The cruise snakes through the Amish countryside and lands at a farmstead for lunch served up by a local caterer (yum) and hosted by a local farmer.  We are WAY, WAY, WAY excited that we are going to be the lunch stop this coming June!  We cannot wait!  

 

 

 

The Amish Tractor Cruise has a Facebook page for those interested in making an entry or those interested in finding a spot along the route to just enjoy the display.   You can get more information HERE.  A tip back to those that have come before us, keeping their memory alive, the marvel of American agricultural engineering or just the sounds of those amazing engines, there is something for everyone coming to the countryside of Arthur this summer!

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

0 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments

Amish Country Tractor Cruise

Each year now for 10 years, a subcommittee from the FFA Alumni Association puts together an astounding event.  Starting about day break, if you venture into town at Yoder's Country Kitchen, and if you have ever been to Arthur, you have SURELY eaten at Yoder's, unless you came on Sunday, then you probably just wish you had eaten at Yoder's.  Well the tractors and trucks and rumbling, popping engines start rolling in one by one.  Red, green, orange and gray starts to fill the parking lot.  Some get registered early and enjoy coffee and some biscuits and gravy along with fellowship and coffee shop talk before the drive.  Others roll in as the parade begins.

 

It is awe inspiring even for non tractor enthusiasts.  The shear sound of the engines and the rolling of the tires makes this event worth seeing.  This taking nothing away from the nostalgia of years gone by.  When our grandfathers and great grandfathers did all of their farming and chores using such tractors.  Seeing the open cabs and wide set back tires paired with the sometimes close set front ends one can't evade thoughts of leather skinned men toiling hours on end in the hot sun, the spitting rain or the bitter cold to get the crops in the ground.  How many acres do you think they could plant in a full day's work back then?  How tired, dirty and worn must grandpa have been after a day such as that.  Contrasting these vintage tractors with what is sitting out in the barn lot mesmerizes ones thoughts back to a simpler time.

 

A shout out to these forefathers with pride and exclamation is what this cruise represents.  So many have plaques on the sides of the tractors indicating make/model current owner and sometimes the origin or original owner of the tractor.  Tears well as tractors cruise by and stories are told of hunting down a tractor belonging to a great grandfather, lovingly restoring it and proudly entering into such a display of Americana. 

 

 

 

 

Last year we were able to help with the cruise for the first time, and we are so grateful and humbled by the experience.  Our oldest son was able to drive a tractor, be it not an old one, as we don't have an old tractor!!  The day was squelching hot, the pavement sticky from the sun and the drivers sweating profusely, some under umbrellas and some toughing it in out in the hot June sun!  Jace, our boy was feeling very badly in his air conditioned cab!  He said at one point he cracked the windows open as a gesture of guilt for his temperature controlled ride.  That softy!!  

 

 

The cruise snakes through the Amish countryside and lands at a farmstead for lunch served up by a local caterer (yum) and hosted by a local farmer.  We are WAY, WAY, WAY excited that we are going to be the lunch stop this coming June!  We cannot wait!  

 

 

 

The Amish Tractor Cruise has a Facebook page for those interested in making an entry or those interested in finding a spot along the route to just enjoy the display.   You can get more information HERE.  A tip back to those that have come before us, keeping their memory alive, the marvel of American agricultural engineering or just the sounds of those amazing engines, there is something for everyone coming to the countryside of Arthur this summer!

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

0 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments

Amish Country Tractor Cruise

Each year now for 10 years, a subcommittee from the FFA Alumni Association puts together an astounding event.  Starting about day break, if you venture into town at Yoder's Country Kitchen, and if you have ever been to Arthur, you have SURELY eaten at Yoder's, unless you came on Sunday, then you probably just wish you had eaten at Yoder's.  Well the tractors and trucks and rumbling, popping engines start rolling in one by one.  Red, green, orange and gray starts to fill the parking lot.  Some get registered early and enjoy coffee and some biscuits and gravy along with fellowship and coffee shop talk before the drive.  Others roll in as the parade begins.

 

It is awe inspiring even for non tractor enthusiasts.  The shear sound of the engines and the rolling of the tires makes this event worth seeing.  This taking nothing away from the nostalgia of years gone by.  When our grandfathers and great grandfathers did all of their farming and chores using such tractors.  Seeing the open cabs and wide set back tires paired with the sometimes close set front ends one can't evade thoughts of leather skinned men toiling hours on end in the hot sun, the spitting rain or the bitter cold to get the crops in the ground.  How many acres do you think they could plant in a full day's work back then?  How tired, dirty and worn must grandpa have been after a day such as that.  Contrasting these vintage tractors with what is sitting out in the barn lot mesmerizes ones thoughts back to a simpler time.

 

A shout out to these forefathers with pride and exclamation is what this cruise represents.  So many have plaques on the sides of the tractors indicating make/model current owner and sometimes the origin or original owner of the tractor.  Tears well as tractors cruise by and stories are told of hunting down a tractor belonging to a great grandfather, lovingly restoring it and proudly entering into such a display of Americana. 

 

 

 

 

Last year we were able to help with the cruise for the first time, and we are so grateful and humbled by the experience.  Our oldest son was able to drive a tractor, be it not an old one, as we don't have an old tractor!!  The day was squelching hot, the pavement sticky from the sun and the drivers sweating profusely, some under umbrellas and some toughing it in out in the hot June sun!  Jace, our boy was feeling very badly in his air conditioned cab!  He said at one point he cracked the windows open as a gesture of guilt for his temperature controlled ride.  That softy!!  

 

 

The cruise snakes through the Amish countryside and lands at a farmstead for lunch served up by a local caterer (yum) and hosted by a local farmer.  We are WAY, WAY, WAY excited that we are going to be the lunch stop this coming June!  We cannot wait!  

 

 

 

The Amish Tractor Cruise has a Facebook page for those interested in making an entry or those interested in finding a spot along the route to just enjoy the display.   You can get more information HERE.  A tip back to those that have come before us, keeping their memory alive, the marvel of American agricultural engineering or just the sounds of those amazing engines, there is something for everyone coming to the countryside of Arthur this summer!

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

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Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

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Amish Country Tractor Cruise

Each year now for 10 years, a subcommittee from the FFA Alumni Association puts together an astounding event.  Starting about day break, if you venture into town at Yoder's Country Kitchen, and if you have ever been to Arthur, you have SURELY eaten at Yoder's, unless you came on Sunday, then you probably just wish you had eaten at Yoder's.  Well the tractors and trucks and rumbling, popping engines start rolling in one by one.  Red, green, orange and gray starts to fill the parking lot.  Some get registered early and enjoy coffee and some biscuits and gravy along with fellowship and coffee shop talk before the drive.  Others roll in as the parade begins.

 

It is awe inspiring even for non tractor enthusiasts.  The shear sound of the engines and the rolling of the tires makes this event worth seeing.  This taking nothing away from the nostalgia of years gone by.  When our grandfathers and great grandfathers did all of their farming and chores using such tractors.  Seeing the open cabs and wide set back tires paired with the sometimes close set front ends one can't evade thoughts of leather skinned men toiling hours on end in the hot sun, the spitting rain or the bitter cold to get the crops in the ground.  How many acres do you think they could plant in a full day's work back then?  How tired, dirty and worn must grandpa have been after a day such as that.  Contrasting these vintage tractors with what is sitting out in the barn lot mesmerizes ones thoughts back to a simpler time.

 

A shout out to these forefathers with pride and exclamation is what this cruise represents.  So many have plaques on the sides of the tractors indicating make/model current owner and sometimes the origin or original owner of the tractor.  Tears well as tractors cruise by and stories are told of hunting down a tractor belonging to a great grandfather, lovingly restoring it and proudly entering into such a display of Americana. 

 

 

 

 

Last year we were able to help with the cruise for the first time, and we are so grateful and humbled by the experience.  Our oldest son was able to drive a tractor, be it not an old one, as we don't have an old tractor!!  The day was squelching hot, the pavement sticky from the sun and the drivers sweating profusely, some under umbrellas and some toughing it in out in the hot June sun!  Jace, our boy was feeling very badly in his air conditioned cab!  He said at one point he cracked the windows open as a gesture of guilt for his temperature controlled ride.  That softy!!  

 

 

The cruise snakes through the Amish countryside and lands at a farmstead for lunch served up by a local caterer (yum) and hosted by a local farmer.  We are WAY, WAY, WAY excited that we are going to be the lunch stop this coming June!  We cannot wait!  

 

 

 

The Amish Tractor Cruise has a Facebook page for those interested in making an entry or those interested in finding a spot along the route to just enjoy the display.   You can get more information HERE.  A tip back to those that have come before us, keeping their memory alive, the marvel of American agricultural engineering or just the sounds of those amazing engines, there is something for everyone coming to the countryside of Arthur this summer!

Farmers Ride "Horses" In Early Summer

People ask often, "What do farmers do all summer and all winter?"  After all, once the crops are all put in the ground and the spring work is done and then you just watch it grow right?  What can you even do about it once it's in the ground.  Just let it go!!  Once planting is done, the farmers go to the lake, family vacations, ride horses and have leisure time until fall, right?

 

I can't speak for all farmers, but here those crops are like a growing child, you would never just let them go unwatched and uncared for!  We put countless miles on our trucks and cars and when we can, we use 4-wheelers and gators monitoring the growing crop.  Just a cowboy may turn his calves out to pasture, he monitors them, often on horseback.  Farming is no different. Our crops just aren't as adorable as those mooing calves and grazing mama cows our on the prairie!

 

 

Early on, this monitoring  is critical as we can head off weed pressure problem as well as insect issues that may arise.  A pick up with a 4-wheeler is our go to, while the crops are small enough to allow the tires of the 4-wheeler to get through the rows.  

Here Makenna is heading out with a little 4-wheeler to check on the crops in Coles county. She documents what she sees in and around the fields utilizing a crop scouting app on her I-pad and then reports back to Justin who then addresses any issues that she may find and he will head out that evening to check on anything that needs further investigation.  

 

It is imperative to get across the acres early and often before the canopy gets too heavy.  Weed pressure can be treated before it gets out of hand and early insect infestation can be stopped or treated if need be.  Once the canopy is established it is more difficult to get through the fields because the beans are taller.  Any weeds that have not been killed before the beans canopy will most likely need to be pulled by hand layer in the season, because spraying will no longer be effective due to the cover the bean leaves provide for the weeds. In other words the herbicide will not be able to get down directly on the weeds surface to do it's job. 

 

Cowboys use horses to check their cattle.  Farmers use 4-wheelers!

 

 

 

 

Dryer

Farm Fans Triple Stack Grain Dryer

 

  • Click photo for Craigslist listing
  • FFI CMS-4263
  • Vision N2 Control
  • AC Meter Drive with VFD
  • Grain inverters
  • 8' Trash pan
  • 4' Auger extension
  • Watch Dog Software
  • Outside catwalk on top 2 modules
  • Full heat 5 pts 3,960 bph, Full heat 10 pts 2,460 bph
  • EXTREMELY CLEAN and EXCELLENT condition
  • paid twice as much for this new in 2013
  • $140,000

 

Also Selling GSI/DMC 6' Air Transfer System

  • 3-480 volt blower, air lock, control panel
  • 75 hp motor and drive package
  • 1 hp. air lock motor
  • precleaner for air intake
  • silencer for blower intake
  • lots of 6" piping
  • $22,000

Mama Doesn't Always Know Best

Yesterday, as our family was all together celebrating Mother's Day, the kids went on a search for the baby kittens born on the farm this spring.  We have located three litters so far.  You never can tell how many may be around the farm, we were expecting two and were surprised when we found what we thought was a wild barn TOM CAT, had a litter of four kittens in the seed shed.  When I say wild barn cat, that's what I mean. Wild.  No can touch.  Not at all.  So I guess we assumed wrong on that one!

 

Those babies stayed in the seed shed for a week or more in a box full of empty seed sacks.  Apparently the commotion in there lately forced her to move them to a big drum also in the seed shed that is more out of the way.  When we couldn't find her in that spot on Sunday we began to worry a little.  Usually worrying about barn cats is silly because they are SMART and take care of themselves and their babies.  They are survivors.  Street smart felines!  

 

Today we heard some kitten cries and upon further investigation realized she had moved them to the bed of  THE SERVICE TRUCK. Um, that won't work!!  Luckily, she was not in there with them (remember the wild part, hissing, showing teeth, throwing claws) so I donned my work gloves and dove in under that big tank there in the back of the truck. I wasn't sure if I was in for a hissing and scratching session from the four babies or not.  Luckily they were pretty docile!  They are now safely back in the seed shed in the barrel where they had been before.

 

 I hope that this other mama cat seen walking away from the truck tells her friend where I moved her babies.  I'm not worried.  Barn cats are street smart.  Those babies will be fine!  Life on the farm...

0 Comments

Visitors!

We love to have visitors on the farm.  These guys came today for a look at our operation and quick lesson on the high speed planter and we are so glad they did!

0 Comments